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Author Topic: The secret to SoKor's, Japan's, HK's, Taiwan's and Singapore's economic success.  (Read 1312 times)

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JustAGambler

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You should not post this. It’s racist.


Offline PETA ( anti-dog eater Police)

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You should not post this. It’s racist.

shut the F up princeV..   we know youre tricks... youre going to post pedophile pics at 3am when everyone is asleep and report us for those pictures you posted.


Idiot

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I'm actually not the same guy you were arguing with and the fact that you think everyone posting without an account is PV must mean you're a mega schizo. You've got problems if you think PV is lurking behind every corner waiting to insult you.

QualityNotQuantity

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I'm actually not the same guy you were arguing with and the fact that you think everyone posting without an account is PV must mean you're a mega schizo. You've got problems if you think PV is lurking behind every corner waiting to insult you.


You made the situation volatile by posting that racist picture. He’s a walking time bomb.

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omg dude, you keep feeding on wrong and outdated data.  The Mekong Delta is now dammed by China, which means agricultural productivity and reliability is no longer profitable.  Vietnam may be importing rice from Africa in the coming years.  Also, Vietnam should be richer due to having neighboring tourists that can drive to Vietnam via cars and trains? WTF, the whole region is dirt poor, the number of native tourists visiting each others´countries are very small and transportation infrastructures via trains nearly non-existent.  Have you ever visited this part of the world on a car or even a motorbike? Each country operates its own road networks and Thailand to Vietnam route is still 95% accessible only by air, not roads.  I took a motorbike tour from Hanoi to Saigon but as soon as I crossed into Cambodia I know it´s not possible to continue to Thailand.  And most tourists do not travel alone and brave the weather. 

So really, both domestic and international tourists fly when they are in one of these countries while trade cargos go through sea routes to the main ports.  This is the reason much of Northern Thailand, Northern Cambodia and Laos are dirt poor.  This region would be richer if they shake off their differences and invest in good roads that run West to East to connect all the countries of mainland Southeast Asia.  Geographically, the Annamite mountain range will be a huge challenge.  They need to dig lots of tunnels and build tracks and blast away a bunch of mountains.  The infrastructural situation could change in the future but we are talking about centuries of collaborated effort here at which date I would be like in my fifth re-incarnation as a white Mexican sipping fresh coconut juice by the beach somewhere in Acapulco.

Yeah I admit that Vietnam has a lot of pluses and resources which the Philippines does not have.

Here are some...

Vietnam has a stable supply of agricultural products since you a have two main sources of deep and reliable water, mainly the Mekong and Red River Deltas. In contrast, our rivers here in the Philippines aren't deep, they're very shallow and quite seasonal and that our agricultural output is lacking at times due to the adverse effects of Climate Change which makes droughts and floods here the norm since we're at the typhoon belt and also in the El Nino zone, in fact, we import most of our rice from Vietnam and Thailand because of this!

Vietnam has also beat us in tourism and transport since she has many neighbors on land, people from Thailand, Cambodia, China and Laos can simply ride a train or drive a car and then poof! You have millions of tourists! In the Philippines, traveling is such a hassle and is very expensive, you either have to ride a plane to reach the next city in the next island or you have to drive to a seaport switch to a boat then switch to back to a car again before you arrive at your destination, which makes transport super expensive. This factor alone would force manufacturers to prefer Vietnam to the Philippines since they simply wouldn't bother with the more expensive logistics! And even when we're a maritime nation we're still just at the outer edge of the maritime world. The world's busiest sea lanes between China, Southeast Asia and India actually skirt through your coasts while international marine traffic ignores us. We only have a ton of domestic ships and sailors because we are forced by geography to have them in order to travel, yet even then, marine-transport wise, Vietnam is still more strategically placed than us.

The next point is related to the previous one, Vietnam has cheaper utility costs since you are on land, you guys can have proper power and communication lines crisscross your terrain without the worry of a sea stopping it and having your power or communication costs multiply since you have to build a God damn power plant or broadcast site in every other God damn separate island.

Vietnam has a far longer history and civilization and thus has a more developed civic and cultural life vs our country. The earliest Vietnamese states were established in 2000+ B.C. In contrast, due to our insular and maritime nature which was only settled quite lately, our oldest states were formed as late as 900 A.D.

And there are so many advantages that Vietnam has which we do not have which makes me boggle over why you under perform and are not working with your potential which is aggregately greater than ours'.

It is through sheer hard work and determination that Filipinos have had got this far, even though we have a lot of setbacks. Yet you guys, due to your advantages can accomplish the same amount of work with even less effort than what we have to frocking endure, so if you're more laid-back now yet you can achieve parity with us who have to work harder, how much more if you just increase your efforts and productivity up by a tiny notch?

Offline PETA ( anti-dog eater Police)

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I'm actually not the same guy you were arguing with and the fact that you think everyone posting without an account is PV must mean you're a mega schizo. You've got problems if you think PV is lurking behind every corner waiting to insult you.

shut the F up and log in... and talk like man.


You made the situation volatile by posting that racist picture. He’s a walking time bomb.

log on b1tch & talk like man..

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South Korea and Japan achieved economic success for only a short time but their populations live very substandard lives.  Chicken coop apartments and suicide from overwork continue to be a common theme.  I generally think Mexicans are much happier despite fewer pesos in el banco.

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The Philippines is actually even more corrupt than Vietnam in practice.  Long term projection for the Philippines does not look good.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourdoukoutas/2019/02/10/dutertes-jobless-economic-boom/#7e5fb9853ed3

The problem with President Rodrigo Duterte’s jobless booming economy in the Philippines isn’t the liberal economic policies his administration has been pursuing. It’s the persistence of corruption and cronyism and cultural populism that divide up Filipinos -- and limit job opportunities for those on the wrong side of the “system.”

The Philippines economy has been growing fast under Duterte. GDP annual growth reached above 7% in 2017, before tapering off to 6.2% in 2018.

That’s well above the 5.5% it hovered around in 2015-16. It’s also well above the country’s long-term potential.

GDP annual growth rate in Philippines averaged 3.72% from 1982 until 2017, reaching an all-time high of 12.40% in the fourth quarter of 1988 and a record low of -11.10% in the first quarter of 1985, according to Tradingeconomics.com.


The trouble is that the ‘boom’ hasn’t created that many jobs, when compared to previous administrations.

That’s according to a recent study by the research group IBON.



The IBON study points to an average annual job creation for 2017 and 2018 of just 81,000. It also notes that the number of employed only increased by 162,000 -- from 41 million in 2016 to 41.2 million -- in 2018, according to the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA).

That’s  well below the annual average job creation under Corazon Aquino in 1987-1992 (810,000), Ramos in 1993-1998 (489,000), Estrada in 1999-2001 (842,000), Arroyo in 2002-2010 (764,000), and Benigno Aquino III in 2011-2016 (827,000) also according the PSA.


What can explain this disconnect between a strong economy and an anemic job growth? Certainly not Duterte’s overly market-driven policies, as IBON group claims.

In fact, the Philippines economy is getting less rather than more market driven under Duterte, according to a recent report from the Heritage Foundation, which shows that the Philippines economy is less free under Duterte. The Philippines’ economic freedom score is 63.8, ranking the country the 70th freest in the 2019 Index. Its overall score has decreased by 1.2 points over the previous year.

In 2018, the Philippines rank in the Ease of Doing Business deteriorated to 124 in 2018 from 113 in 2017 and 99 in 2016.

That’s below the country’s long-term average ranking. Ease of Doing Business in Philippines averaged 120.73 from 2008 until 2018, reaching an all-time high of 144 in 2009 and a record low of 97 in 2014.

With the ease of doing business index falling, Duterte’s administration has relied on government rather than private initiatives to stimulate the economy.

“Continued strong economic growth, driven in part by ambitious state-funded infrastructure projects, has allowed the government to prioritize domestic law-and-order issues over economic policy concerns,” says the Heritage Foundation report. “Investors remain concerned about President Duterte’s heavy-handed rule, although Duterte has consolidated support from Congress.”

That “thwarts” development, according to the report, which points the need for further reforms.

“Despite the adoption of some fiscal reforms, deeper institutional reforms are needed in interrelated areas: business freedom, investment freedom, and the rule of law,” adds the report. “The judicial system remains weak and vulnerable to political influence.”

In the meantime, the reasons for the disconnect between strong economic growth and weak job creation in the Philippines must be sought elsewhere. Like the persistence of corruption and cronyism. And Duterte’s cultural populism, which divide up Filipinos into two worlds – one that consists of those who have access to the coalition of private and government groups that control the country’s resources and can get jobs, and one that does not.

Those who exist in that second world either remain unemployed or join the shadow economy and will never be counted as being unemployed.

 
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